About the Authors

Jeffry Gayman is a Professor of Media and Communication at the School of Education at Hokkaido University.  He earned his Ph.D. in educational anthropology at Kyushu University and is the author of “Ainu Puri: Content and Praxis of an Indigenous Philosophy of a Northern People” in Indigenous Philosophies of Education Around the World and co-authored “Rethinking Japan’s Constitution from the Perspective of the Ainu and Ryūkyū Peoples” in The Asian-Pacific Journal: Japan Focus, as well as numerous other publications.

Robert Hitchcock is an Adjunct Professor of Anthropology and Acting Assistant to the Chair of the Department of Anthropology at the University of New Mexico.  He earned his Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of New Mexico and is the co-author of the book, The Ju/’hoan San of Nyae Nyae and Namibian Independence: Development, Democracy, and Indigenous Voices in Southern Africa, and author of People, Parks and Power: The Ethics of Conservation-related Resettlement, as well as numerous other publications.

Douglas W. Hume is an Associate Professor of Anthropology and Chair of the Sociology, Anthropology, and Philosophy Department at Northern Kentucky University.  He earned his Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Connecticut and is the author of “Darkness in Academia: Cultural Models of How Anthropologists and Journalists Write about Controversy” in World Cultures eJournal and “Anthropology: Tribal Warfare” in Nature, as well as numerous other publications.

Xabier Irujo (Basque in exile) is a Professor of Genocide Studies and the Director of the Center for Basque Studies at the University of Nevada at Reno.  He earned his Ph.D. in history from the Public University of the Navarre and Ph.D. in philosophy from the University of the Basque Country and is the author of the books, Gernika, 1937: The Market Day Massacre and The Bombing of Gernika, as well as numerous other publications.

Stephen M. Lyon is a Professor of Anthropology and Head of Education Programmes and Development at The Aga Khan University Institute for the Study of Muslim Civilizations.  He earned his Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Kent at Canterbury and is the author of the book, Political Kinship in Pakistan: Descent, Marriage and Government Stability, and numerous other publications.

Margaret Mutu (Native Maori/Ngāti Kahu, Te Rarawa, Ngāti Whātua) is a Professor of Maori Studies at the University of Auckland.  She earned her Ph.D. in Maori studies and linguistics at the University of Auckland and is the author of the books, Te Whānau Moana: Ngā kaupapa me ngā tikanga: Customs and Protocols, The State of Maori Rights, and Ngāti Kahu: Portrait of a Sovereign Nation, as well as numerous other publications.

Sharlotte Neely is Professor Emerita of Anthropology at Northern Kentucky University.  She earned her Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and is the author of the book, Snowbird Cherokees: People of Persistence, as well as numerous other publications.

‘Umi Perkins (Native Hawaiian/Kanaka Maoli) teaches Hawaiian history at the Kamehameha Schools, Kapalama and is a Lecturer at the Matsunaga Institute for Peace and Conflict Resolution at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.  He earned his Ph.D. in political science from the University of Hawaii at Manoa and has written for The Nation, as well as having numerous other publications.

Maria Sapignoli is a Social Anthropology Research Fellow at the Max Planck Institute for Social Anthropology in Germany.  She earned her Ph.D. in sociology from the University of Essex in England and is the co-editor of Palaces of Hope: The Anthropology of Global Organizations and author of Hunting Justice: Displacement, Law, and Activism in the Kalahari, as well as numerous other publications.

Michael J. Simonton is a Lecturer in Anthropology and Director of Celtic Studies at Northern Kentucky University.  He earned his Ph.D. in anthropology from the National University of Ireland, Galway, and is the author of Introduction to Cultural Anthropology, as well as numerous other publications.

Dikka Storm was a Curator and Assistant Professor in the Department of Cultural Sciences at the Tromsø Museum, University of Tromsø—the Arctic University of Norway.  She earned her Cand. Polit. in geography from the University of Bergen and is the author of Slettnes på Soroya: Sluttrapport, Undersokelser av Samisk Kuturhisorie, as well as numerous other publications.

Mark Q. Sutton is Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at California State University, Bakersfield and now teaches at the University of San Diego.  He earned his Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of California, Riverside and is the author of Introduction to Native North America, as well as numerous other publications.

Robert Tonkinson is Professor Emeritus of Anthropology at the University of Western Australia.  He earned his Ph.D. from the University of British Columbia and is the author of The Mardu Aborigines: Living the Dream in Australia’s Desert, as well as numerous other publications.

Yuan-Chao Tung is an Associate Professor of Anthropology at the National University of Taiwan.  She earned her Ph.D. in anthropology from Southern Methodist University and is the author of “Reflections of the Studies of Overseas Chinese in the Pacific” in Asia Pacific Research Forum (亞太研究論壇) and “Oceania Society: A Culture of Homology and Diversity” (大洋洲社會:同源而多樣的文化) in Historical Monthly (歷史月刊), as well as numerous other publications.